Time for Salah Interactive Story

With one week until ‘Eid-ul-Fitr insha’Allah, and its beautiful congregational Salah, it’s an ideal time for Muslim educators to encourage young children to be excited about making the ritual prayer, to learn the names of each Salah and their times, and to develop gratitude for having easy, clean spaces within which to perform Salah alhamdulillah. Here is an interactive story to help with this insha’Allah.

Please consider this script as merely a template: personalise it for your child by including their name, home town, favourite colour, usual phrases, etc.; act it out with your child all the way through or concentrate your interactivity on the times for salah; sing the rhymes or recite them with rhythm. You choose.

Props recommended: Keys; picture of the Ka’bah; dustpan and brush; scarves/play cloths; salah mats; tea cup; crayon.

Tick, Tock: Time for Salah

Amina was a little girl who lived in Edinburgh with her mummy and daddy. During the day, Amina and Mummy stayed together, and Daddy went to work.

At the weekends, Daddy usually stayed with Amina and Mummy. But not this weekend.

During Friday night, Mummy woke Amina before dawn. Amina sleepily got out of bed and saw that Daddy was dressed for going out. “I’m going away to Makkah to perform Umrah insha’Allah,” he told her. He handed her his keys. “Look after these for me while I’m away, please. I’ll see you next weekend insha’Allah. Ma salaam,” Amina took his keys and nodded. He kissed her and off he went.

Amina looked down at the keys in her hands. She was shocked. Mummy wasn’t. “Daddy’s been making du’a to Allah, asking to go to Makkah, for a long time,” Mummy explained. “Come on Amina, let me show you a picture of where Daddy is going.”

So Amina and Mummy looked at a picture of the Ka’bah in Makkah. “Insha’Allah Daddy will be able to make Salah right where he can see the Kab’ah,” said Mummy. “When I perform Salah, I face the Ka’bah, but it’s too far away for me to see it.”

Just then, the adhan clock sounded.

“Allahu akbar! Allahu akbar!”

Mummy went to the bathroom to make wudu’. Amina had watched her make wudu’ many times. This time, when Mummy had finished at the sink, Amina took a turn and make wudu’ as well.

Then Amina and Mummy swept the floor to make a clean space for Salah, and, side by side, made Sabar Salah together.

Quickety, Tickety, Tock

(Hickory, Dickory, Dock)

Quickety, tickety, tock, [Bend and sweep]

We’re mindful of the clock.

Dawn lights the sky –

Sabar time ticks by;

Quickety, tickety, tock, [Stand and raise hands as if for Salah]

Tick, tock, tick, tock.

After lunch, when the adhan clock sounded, Mummy and Amina made wudu’, swept the floor to make a clean space for Salah, and made Dhur Salah, side by side together again.

“Allahu akbar! Allahu akbar!”

Quickety, Tickety, Tock

Quickety, tickety, tock, [Encourage child to join in with actions]

We’re mindful of the clock.

Gone noon’s the sun –

Dhur time’s begun;

Quickety, tickety, tock,

Tick, tock, tick, tock.

In the afternoon, Amina and Mummy were finishing their tea when the adhan clock sounded again. “Allahu akbar! Allahu akbar!”

What do you think Amina did? She put down her cup, went to the bathroom and made wudu’, swept the floor to make a clean space for Salah, and made ‘Asr Salah side by side with Mummy.

Quickety, Tickety, Tock

Quickety, tickety, tock, [Perform/mime actions together]

We’re mindful of the clock.

See shadows long –

‘Asr time has come;

Quickety, tickety, tock,

Tick, tock, tick, tock.

When the adhan clock sounded the next time, Amina was busy colouring. What do you think she did? She put down her crayon, made wudu’, swept the floor to make a clean space for Salah, and made Maghrib Salah with Mummy.

Quickety, Tickety, Tock

Quickety, tickety, tock, [Perform/mime actions together]

We’re mindful of the clock.

The sun has set –

It’s Maghrib yet;

Quickety, tickety, tock,

Tick, tock, tick, tock.

It was late when the adhan clock sounded for ‘Isha’ Salah. Amina had changed into her pyjamas, was checking Daddy’s keys were safely on her shelf, and feeling ready for bed.

“Allahu akbar! Allahu akbar!”

Do you think Amina made Salah this time? You’re right, she did. She made wudu’, swept the floor to make a clean space for Salah, and she and Mummy made ‘Isha’ Salah together.

Quickety, Tickety, Tock

Quickety, tickety, tock, [Perform/mime actions together]

We’re mindful of the clock.

The stars now shine –

It’s ‘Isha’ time;

Quickety, tickety, tock,

Tick, tock, tick, tock.

And this is how Amina and Mummy continued. All week: on Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday.

On the following Saturday, Amina and Mummy had performed their Sabar Salah early in the morning and read Dhur Salah after lunch. But the next sound they heard wasn’t the adhan clock. What do you think it was?

Ding-dong! went the doorbell.

“Who can that be?” said Mummy.

“Daddy!” cried Amina. “He had to ring the bell because I’ve got his keys.”

Amina opened the door and there was Daddy. She gave him a big, long hug, and then they all sat down with a cup of tea to hear about his Umrah. At the Ka’bah, he told Amina, nobody needed an adhan clock because a man called the mu’athin called the adhan when it was time to pray.

Amina told Daddy that she’d been making Salah towards the Ka’bah all week with Mummy.

carpet-65092_1280“SubhanAllah.” said Daddy, and he made a quick sajdah. Than he reached into his suitcase and pulled out two new Salah mats he’d bought in Makkah. One for Amina and one for Mummy.

Just then, the adhan clock sounded for ‘Asr Salah. “Allahu akbar! Allahu akbar!”

So, Amina, Mummy and Daddy made wudu’. Then they laid out the new Salah mats and made ‘Asr Salah together. Daddy prayed in front on his own new mat, and Amina and Mummy laid their new mats one beside the other.

Amina decided insha’Allah to keep making Salah on her new mat from Makkah everyday. She hoped that one day she would go to Makkah and make Salah where she could see the Ka’bah. She made her first du’a to go on Umrah, even though she knew she may have to ask Allah for a long, long time.

Insha’Allah, like Amina, we can all turn towards the Ka’bah everyday, perform Salah, and make du’a to ask Allah to grant us the blessing of going to the Ka’bah in Makkah for Hajj and Umrah.

This simple interactive story works excellently mid morning when young children are full of energy and do not need to calm down for a meal or nap. Children often love to play with props during stories, and are reluctant to return them … so you can embrace this by allowing them some cleaning time and Salah time after the story session.

Elizabeth Lymer

Elizabeth Lymer

Rhymer-Lymer, Rainbow-Liker!... Elizabeth Lymer is a children's author who, so far, has mostly published religious nursery rhymes. She has illustrated several YouTube videos for her rhymes and stories, often choosing her favourite rainbow colours. She's even designed rainbow 'bedtime bags' to home favourite books ready for cosy bedtimes.

Elizabeth loves reading children's books, oral storytelling, and singing rhymes. She blogs about various books at http://rhymesandstories.co.uk/. Alhamdulillah she's started self-publishing through Aneesa Books and insha'Allah is working with various illustrators to bring you some great stories. Insha'Allah, there will likely be a rainbow or a few among them 🙂
Elizabeth Lymer

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2 Responses to “Time for Salah Interactive Story

  • This was absolutely beautiful, mashaAllah. I loved the simplicity and the repetition and the interactiveness, but most of all I loved the sweetness in this tale. I can’t wait to share it with my little one, and I think it would be great to do as a playdate activity as well. JazakAllahi khairan for this adorable story.

  • BarakAllah feekum, Azra. In my experience, the grown-ups have at least as much fun as the children, alhamdulillah!

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